U.S. Department of Defense Awards $37M Contract To Silicon Valley-based Cybersecurity Startup Qadium

"The Defense Department used to love to build its own IT, often poorly and at high cost to taxpayers," said Tim Junio, CEO of Qadium CEO and a CIA veteran.

qadium-dodCybersecurity startup Qadium, a company providing real-time monitoring of the entire global Internet for customers’ assets, has been awarded a $37.6 million contract by the U.S. Department of Defense. This would make it the latest venture-backed startup from Silicon Valley to win a major federal contract over traditional Beltway defense contractors.

The contract was awarded by the U.S. Navy’s Space and Warfare Command after the Department of Defense validated Qadium’s commercial software. Qadium is now recognized among a small handful of cybersecurity providers, with DoD making its software accessible department-wide.

“The Defense Department used to love to build its own IT, often poorly and at high cost to taxpayers,” said Tim Junio, CEO of Qadium CEO and a CIA veteran. “The times are finally changing. In the face of the greatest cybersecurity challenges in our nation’s history, we’re seeing the government and private tech companies coming together, making both sides better off.”

PayPal, U.S. Cyber Command

The new government contract builds on Qadium’s prior work for Defense Department entities including U.S. Cyber Command, the Defense Information Systems Agency, Fleet Cyber Command, Army Cyber Command and the DoD CIO office.

Qadium also works with “elite” enterprise customers including Allergan, CVS, Fluor and PayPal, among others.

As a Silicon Valley-based startup, Qadium launched its first product in 2016. Its investors include New Enterprise Associates, TPG, Institutional Venture Partners and Founders Fund. Qadium’s platform indexes the entire global Internet in real time, giving corporate and government customers a comprehensive view of their extended, constantly-changing network edge and the ability to block “machine-speed” threats. This can include so-called “Shadow IT” in cloud services, regional offices violating policy, employees taking privileged equipment off-premise, and more.