The new Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.4 release features Red Hat OpenShift Plus, a new platform that provides support for 3-node clusters and remote worker nodes. This makes it possible to apply Kubernetes to edge devices with low power consumption. But there are more edge capabilities added to the RHEL platform.

By 2025 we will be dealing with about 90 zettabytes of data between our Internet-of-Things (IoT) devices and edge-related services, according to the study/report ‘2021 State of the Edge’ conducted by the Linux Foundation. Red Hat expects that its updated Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8.4 is the right foundation for an edge-ready technology stack to handle all this data.

Red Hat Universal Base Image has also received an update. This software will make it possible to build small RHEL installations to run in containers. It would now be easier to select within UBI which operating system features you want to keep in your container Linux – – such as SELinux security. Intended for edge computing, UBI is now available in the form of a lightweight image.

There are more improvements within RHEL 8.4. No matter where containers are, Podman 3 would make it possible to manage them. Whether these containers are deployed local, in a data center or in the cloud. Also, the new version of Podman allows users to automatically make updates to their containers.

Furthermore, Application Stream within RHEL 8.4 will now have the option to either continue working with an existing version of a language or tool – such as GCC, Node.js or Ruby, or update to a newer version of the language.

RHEL Servers

Stefanie Chiras, Red Hat
“The open hybrid cloud isn’t limited to an enterprise datacenter or public cloud environments; it includes the remote servers, advanced machinery and other devices that exist on the far reaches of the enterprise network,” said “The open hybrid cloud isn’t limited to an enterprise datacenter or public cloud environments; it includes the remote servers, advanced machinery and other devices that exist on the far reaches of the enterprise network,” said Stefanie Chiras, Red Hat.

The new Red Hat Enterprise Linux version would also make it easier to manage subscriptions. With RHEL, subscriptions are replaced by streamlined services. In addition, subscriptions across different hybrid clouds can become more visible in the new version of RHEL.

To make it possible for users to manage their RHEL servers from any location, the Web console now shows live and historical performance data on CPU, memory, network and storage. This would help detect problems faster. It would also give a better overview of what is going on within servers. Next to that, the Co-Pilot (PCP) tool has received an update. It becomes possible to monitor and manage near real-time performance data.

“The open hybrid cloud isn’t limited to an enterprise datacenter or public cloud environments; it includes the remote servers, advanced machinery and other devices that exist on the far reaches of the enterprise network,” said Stefanie Chiras, senior vice president and general manager, Red Hat Enterprise Linux Business Unit, Red Hat. “The disparate nature of these footprints means that consistency is critical to success – Red Hat Enterprise Linux, as the backbone for the Red Hat Edge initiative, provides this consistent, edge-native and intelligent platform to meet the dynamic demands of the hybrid cloud, from bare-metal servers to the cloud to the edge.”

The new RHEL 8.4 will be available in the coming weeks. Users with a RHEL subscription can get access to it through the Red Hat Customer Portal.

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